The Spring Blog

Engineering
Releases
News and Events

The Spring Web Flow 2.0 Vision

Spring Web Flow 2.0 M2 has just released. I am particularly excited about this release because it sets the foundation we need to realize the bold vision we have for our community for the future. In this entry, I’ll explain what that vision is, and exactly what this foundation will enable. I’ll also go into detail about the architecture of Web Flow 2.0, and compare it to the 1.0 version.

The Spring Web Flow 2.0 Vision


* UPDATE: The vision above was updated on 1/11/08 after considering large amounts of feedback from the Spring community since The Spring Experience 2007. Based on that feedback, Spring Web Flow 2.0, scheduled to release in March 2008, will remain focused on the orchestration of controlled navigation and application transactions in a web application, usable as a complement to Spring MVC in an action-based MVC environment and JavaServerFaces in a component-based environment. When used with JSF, Spring Web Flow 2.0 can power an entire JSF-based web application as a “black box” or can be mixed with standard JSF navigation handlers that implement free-navigation requirements. 2.0, therefore, will be an evolutionary release adding first-class support for JSF and Ajax, supporting Java 1.4+, and providing full backwards compatibility with the SWF 1.0 flow definition language.

Read more...

Annotated Web MVC Controllers in Spring 2.5

Spring 2.5 introduces an approach for writing annotated Web MVC controllers, which we haven’t been blogging about much yet… I’ll take the opportunity to give you an overview of what Spring MVC is really about these days.

Spring MVC is essentially a request dispatcher framework, with a Servlet API variant and Portlet API variant. It operates very closely within its hosting environment - either Servlets or Portlets. Think about Spring MVC as providing foundational facilities and conveniences on top of the Servlet/Portlet container: e.g. flexible request mappings, separation between controller processing and view rendering phase, data binding, basic JSP tag libraries that complement the JSTL, etc. The building blocks of sophisticated HTTP request processing.

Read more...

Download the "Spring in Production" white paper

We recently hosted a webinar on the theme of “Spring in Production.” I promised then to make the recording of the webinar and accompanying slides available on our website. Unfortunately the engineers producing the webinar for us forgot to set the ‘record’ flag, so I need to re-record the session for you :(. I’m traveling at the moment but I’ll try to do that and make it available as soon as I can.

The good news is that there’s no need for you to miss out in the meantime. I wrote a white paper on the topic of “Spring in Production” that covers the material from the webinar and more besides. This white paper is available right now for download.

Read more...

A Response to: EJB 3 and Spring Comparative Analysis

Last night I attended a New England Java User Group (NEJUG) meeting where Reza Rahman presented a "comparative analysis" of EJB 3 and Spring. Reza is one of the authors of EJB 3 in Action. I enjoyed meeting Reza and respect him for presenting what may be considered a controversial topic. Also I appreciate that he did attempt to address pros and cons for both EJB 3 and Spring. Nevertheless, I feel compelled to clarify a few points that were not wholly accurate in his coverage of Spring and which led me (and other attendees) to believe the presentation was motivated by a bias toward EJB 3. To be fair, unlike a fixed specification version, Spring is constantly evolving and some of the things that I will point out here are new features. On the other hand, some are Spring 2.0 features that have been available for more than a year. I personally believe that a "comparative analysis" must account for the up-to-date feature set of the latest stable version of the products being compared. I think it goes without saying that I might be a bit biased as well, but my motivation here is to provide a wholly objective response so that the presentation could perhaps be revised to reflect a more 'apples-to-apples' comparison. I will provide brief responses to 10 "themes" of the presentation.

Read more...

Spring Java Configuration Moving Ahead

Several users have asked whether we are committed to Spring Java Configuration, and how it sits with the annotation configuration option introduced in Spring 2.5. The answer is yes, we are committed to Java Config; and these two approaches are not mutually exclusive.

These two configuration approaches are quite different: the @Autowired annotation in the Spring Framework configures components using annotations in business objects, while Spring Java Config takes a unique approach of externalizing the annotations in dedicated configuration classes. Neither of these approaches is uniquely right or wrong, and they are compelling for different circumstances. There is even no reason that both couldn’t be used in the same application.

Read more...

Spring LDAP 1.2 Released

Dear Spring Community,

We are pleased to announce the release of Spring LDAP version 1.2. This is a major release that introduces a number of features and bugfixes.

            Download | ChangeLog | Documentation (HTML) | Documentation (PDF) | API

A summary of the more important changes:

  • Java 5 Generics support is now provided with the SimpleLdapTemplate and ParameterizedContextMapper classes.
  • Client-side LDAP transactions.
  • Several additional API methods, simplifying a number of common tasks.

About Spring LDAP
Spring LDAP is a Java library for simplifying LDAP operations, based on the pattern of Spring’s JdbcTemplate. The framework relieves the user of the burden of looking up and closing contexts, looping through NamingEnumerations, encoding/decoding values and filters, and more.

Read more...

Spring 2.5 RC1 is here - introducing new configuration approaches

As some of you will have noticed already, Spring 2.5 RC1 has finally been released on Monday and is waiting for you to give it a test drive! Spring 2.5 is in many ways the release that completes Spring 2.0’s mission: providing the most flexible and most comprehensive configuration model for both Java 1.4 and Java 5. Spring 2.5 focuses on particularly comprehensive support for Java 5, introducing various further annotations options. I’d like to take the opportunity to point out the unifying themes behind this release:

Read more...

Spring Framework 2.5 RC1 released

Dear Spring community,

I’m pleased to announce that the first Spring Framework 2.5 release candidate is available! Spring 2.5 is the culmination of the effort that started as Spring 2.1 milestones, enhancing Spring 2.0 with many new features, such as:

  • full Java 6 and Java EE 5 support (JDBC 4.0, JTA 1.1, JavaMail 1.4, JAX-WS 2.0, etc)  
  • full-featured annotation-driven dependency injection (including support for ‘qualifiers’) 
  • support for component scanning in the classpath (autodetecting annotated classes) 
  • bean name pointcut element in AspectJ pointcut expressions 
  • built-in support for for AspectJ load-time weaving (based on the LoadTimeWeaver abstraction) 
  • further XML configuration namespaces ("context", "jms") for maximum convenience 
  • completely revised framework for integration tests (with support for JUnit 4 and TestNG)
  • new annotation-based controller style for Servlet MVC and Portlet MVC
  • extended SimpleJdbcTemplate functionality (support for named parameters etc) 
  • officially certified WebSphere support (support for the WebSphere 6 UOWManager facility) 
  • Spring framework jars are shipped as OSGi-compliant bundles out of the box
  • Spring ApplicationContext can be deployed as JCA RAR file (for headless application modules) 
  • JCA 1.5 message endpoint management (for Spring-managed JMS and CCI message listeners)
Read more...

The Spring Tool Suite

You may have seen some of the recent press surrounding the announcement that Interface21 is partnering with Tasktop to create a “Spring Tool Suite”. This suite will bring together Spring IDE, the AspectJ Development Tools (AJDT), AspectJ, and Mylyn to create a task-focused approach to the development of Spring-powered enterprise applications. We hope to have a preview of the integrated suite available to share with you at the forthcoming The Spring Experience conference, but in the meantime you’ll see many of the improvements flowing into the existing Spring IDE, AJDT, AspectJ, and Mylyn open source projects.

Read more...

Gartner Nails It on Innovation and Disruption

At last month's Gartner Open Source conference, analysts declared that open source had permeated a significant amount of the global software market. The details were highlighted in a recent Matt Asay blog that quotes the eWeek article. eWeek writes: “open-source products accounted for a 13 percent share of the $92.7 billion software market in 2006, but should account for 27 percent of the market in 2011 when revenue is expected to be $169.2 billion.”

At the same time, Gartner analysts Massimo Pezzini and Yefim Natis have published a report highlighting an important vein of disruption currently underway in the middleware and transaction processing markets. The September 24, 2007 report, titled “Trends in Platform Middleware: Disruption is in Sight,” highlights more than a dozen trends that “will disrupt the apparently static application server and transaction processing markets” and warns that “platform middleware users and vendors will be impacted and must delineate proper survival strategies.” Spring prominently is mentioned in four of the top 11 trends.

Read more...