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Debunking myths: proxies impact performance

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Grails and Maven: a Marriage of Inconvenience

Introduction

Grails seems to be going from strength to strength, and it looks like it definitely “has legs”, as they say. I am quite interested in stretching those legs a little outside the web application arena. If you are aware of my work on Spring Batch, you will probably be able to guess where that might take me. But for this article I wanted to just share some experiences I’ve had with the basic, low-level deployment and build of a Grails application.

I have a love/hate relationship with Maven 2, and I am learning to love Grails, but sadly the two do not play particularly well together. It would be really nice to see tighter integration. Maven is not always everything we want it to be, but there are some things that really make it worthwhile. It is a standard of sorts (love it or hate it) so when I download a project from somewhere I already know how to build it, what its dependencies are and where the documentation is. Grails has some of the same features, and in fact includes its own quite sophisticated build tool based on Groovy scripting of Ant. Maybe there is a middle way, where we can have the best of both worlds?

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Setter injection versus constructor injection and the use of @Required

A couple of month ago, we start publishing polls on www.springframework.org asking people to provide their feedback about Spring, some of its features and how they are using those features. The first question I posted was whether or not people were checking required dependencies and if so, what mechanisms they used. I quickly followed up on this question asking the community what transaction management strategy it used.

To my delight when I first checked the results, back in March, a lot of people told us by voting in the first poll that they were using the @Required annotation. The second poll–on transaction management, quickly showed that a lot of people were using the @Transactional annotation. Below you can find some of the results of the poll about checking required dependencies. Together with the poll on transaction management (about 30% of all respondents are using the @Transactional annotation to demarcate transaction boundaries) they consistently show that people are using Spring 2.0 a lot, which was very good news for us. Because upgrading an application that uses Spring 1.x to use Spring 2.0 shouldn’t be any issue, we really hoped people would not stick to Spring 1.x and in fact, people massively upgraded.

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Java EE 6 Gets it Right

The Java EE 6 proposal (JSR 316) was published today. I believe that this will be the most important revision of the platform since it was released nearly 10 years ago, and that it should be welcomed by users of the technology. Interface21 is happy to be a supporter of this JSR, and I am looking forward to contributing to it.

Java EE (known as J2EE for most of its history) has played a valuable role in creating a market for Java middleware. However, over those 10 years, important issues have emerged with the platform, such as:

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