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SpringSource tc Server - The logical next step

The time is ripe for lightweight AND enterprise class Java application servers, and Apache Tomcat is the pick of the litter. And now, with SpringSource tc Server, we at SpringSource make it a reality.

If you were familiar with Covalent, and now SpringSource, then you most likely know about ERS (Enterprise Ready Server). ERS is our pre-built, pre-packaged and fully QA-ed distribution of the Apache httpd web server and Apache Tomcat. Included in the distro are also some very useful enhancements, in the form of modules, for Apache, such as PHP, mod_perl and mod_snmp. The somewhat unfortunate aspect of the distro is that, except for mod_jk, the added, extra bits to the Tomcat side were pretty minimal.

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Oracle Adds New Exhibit to Java Technology Museum

Last year, Oracle acquired BEA Systems, the hottest company in enterprise Java…until around 2001.

Today, they announced the acquisition of Sun Microsystems, the architects of the infrastructure of the dot com era. Remember the “dot in dot com”??

Both companies represent the history of enterprise Java, and are far less important to the future.

Larry Ellison states that “Java is the single most important software we’ve ever acquired."? Ellison is right about the importance of Java: Java is the world’s #1 programming language and the dominant choice of the enterprise. But the question is exactly what has Oracle acquired? There is no purpose to be served by Oracle trying to milk the Java language itself for profit–and, in any case, it’s now open enough to make that impossible. (Open sourcing Java did turn out to matter. A lot.) And it is a long time since Sun controlled enterprise Java in a meaningful way.

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Spring Web Flow Project Update

The Spring Web Flow project team has just completed the 7th maintenance release of Web Flow 2. This is our best release to-date and comes nearly one year to the day of the Web Flow 2.0.0 final release. Now, with the 2.0.x line mature and stable, we are beginning work on the next major version. In this entry, I would like to reflect on the past year and also provide some information on where we are headed.

Web Flow 2 Adoption

When Web Flow 2 was released last year, we saw 50,000 downloads in the first two months after the release. Since then, our forum traffic has steadily increased, and we have seen new adoption across several exciting industries. Many of you know Spring Web Flow is the foundation of Orbitz's on-line travel platform which today powers sites such as ebookers.com and nwa.com. If you have been following the 2009 NBA playoffs, you may also find it interesting Web Flow is an important component of nba.com as well.

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Enterprise Java and the American Motors Gremlin

You may remember the AMC Gremlin–a strong claimant for ugliest car ever. The Gremlin was produced back in the 70s, but there are still a few around, like this one, which I photographed last year in San Francisco.

AMC Gremlin

The enterprise Java experience today reminds me of this piece of American motoring heritage. The Gremlin was a desperate response to the oil shock. AMC needed a “compact” car, so they took the smallest car they had and chopped it in half. The end result sold surprisingly well, but showed unmistakable signs of the fact that its front and rear were produced by different teams and hastily cobbled together. Needless to say, it was Japanese and European manufacturers who triumphed in the shift toward smaller cars.

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Proxies in OSGi

Over the past couple of months, we’ve had a number of customers report issues to us regarding ClassNotFoundExceptions and proxies in dm Server. The issue actually has to do with type visibility in OSGi and is explained very well by Peter Kriens over at the OSGi Alliance Blog. Please take a look at his post if you are seeing classloading issues when using proxies in dm Server or any other OSGi runtime.

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Write your Google App Engine applications in Groovy

[caption id=“attachment_1577” align=“alignright” width=“250” caption=“Google App Engine Groovy”]Google App Engine Groovy[/caption]

Google just announced that their Google App Engine cloud hosting platform now supports other languages than Python: namely Java and Groovy!

You can now effectively write your Google App Engine applications in Groovy!

A couple of weeks ago, the SpringSource Groovy team and the Google App Engine Java team worked together, hand in hand, to iron out the details, to ensure that the popular and award-winning Groovy dynamic language for the JVM would run well on this exciting platform. After having created together some patches for Groovy, in the area of constrained and strict security manager policies, the Groovy development team integrated these patches and released the updated Groovy 1.6.1 version in line for the D-Day. With this new release, you can directly use the “groovy-all” JAR in your WEB-INF/lib directory and get started writing your applications in Groovy, right away, and host them on Google’s infrastructure.

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Announcing dm Server 2.0 M1

Development work on dm Server 2.0 has been fully underway for some time now and I’m pleased to announce that the first milestone is available for download. Downloads are available from our home page. You can find more information about the features in this release and the coming release in my previous entry.

In this blog entry I’ll outline:

  • what is new in 2.0 M1
  • building dm Server directly from SVN

We're using Scrum

For the development of the 2.0 release, the dm Server team have adopted Scrum. You can see our current sprint and release backlogs in our JIRA. As ever, the development of dm Server is driven by the requirements of our users. If you see an item on the backlog that you’d like us to implement, please take the time to vote for it. Equally, if you’d like dm Server to be able to do something that isn’t currently covered by an item on the backlog, please open a new user story describing what you’d like to be able to do.

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SpringSource dm Server Roadmap

We get a lot of questions from dm Server users about what to expect in the next few releases. In this blog entry, I will outline the main features that we have on our roadmap. We are following Scrum practices so you can expect to see reasonably frequent milestones as output from our sprints, and we are flexible in handling new requirements and changes in priorities.

Shared repositories

Shared repositories allow you to have a centralized location for managing the artifacts that are available to be installed in your dm Server instances. These shared repositories can then be added to a dm Server configuration at any point in its repository chain.

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