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Spring Security 2.0 Final Release: No More Dead Fairies

Spring Security 2.0 has been released. This is a major step forward for the Spring Portfolio. Spring (Acegi) Security is already the Java platform’s most widely used enterprise security framework, with over 250,000 downloads on SourceForge and over 20,000 downloads per release. Through making it so much simpler to use, this release will undoubtedly take adoption to a new level.

I’m particularly pleased about this release for a number of reasons:


  • It’s a great thing for the Spring community. It’s (a lot) simpler to use, as well as more powerful. It puts the most powerful enterprise Java security solution within the reach of many more users, pretty much eliminating the hurdles to adoption. See this tutorial for an example of just how much easier it makes it to secure a typical web application. The proliferation of XML bean definitions is a thing of the past.

  • It’s a continuation of the work of Spring 2.x, through applying the power of a custom XML namespace to enable aggressive defaulting, while still allowing for customization.

  • Like Spring 2.5, it exhibits the current Spring Portfolio trend toward radical reduction in the need for XML.
  • It’s a proof of the value of the SpringSource business model. Our revenue model enables us to invest more than ever in creating open source software. Without being able to hire both Acegi/Spring Security creator Ben Alex and the other major committer, Luke Taylor, this release either wouldn’t have occurred or would have been much less extensive.

  • It’s good for the fairy kingdom.
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Runtime Error Analysis in the SpringSource Tool Suite

Three weeks ago, the SpringSource Tool Suite was released. Christian, in charge of this product blogged about it already and we also have a webinar available for those of you that want to get up to speed with all of the functionality it currently offers. In this entry, I wanted to highlight the runtime error reporting functionality specifically.

When I’m programming, sometimes, the console window shows dozens of stack traces due to some error I’ve caused. Sometimes, I’m lucky and the stack trace looks familiar. If so, then the problem is probably easy to solve. Sometimes however, the information you need is buried so deep inside all those stack traces, that figuring out what the real problem is takes a while.

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The Biggest Loser's Next Contestant: Java Bloatware

If the tech community were to host their own version of the popular TV show The Biggest Loser (or maybe Celebrity Fit Club) you would see enterprise Java front and center—bloated, overweight, tired, and drained.

The future of enterprise Java is becoming clear. The morbidly obese legacy platforms are in decline, with leaner solutions increasingly used in production as well as in development. Legacy technologies such as EJB are becoming less and less relevant.The lukewarm takeup of Java EE 5 leaves it looking increasingly like the last gasp of traditional J2EE bloatware. Meanwhile, the Java EE 6 specification is finally set to allow for greater modularity, in a radical change which will have important implications for developers and is likely to rejuvenate competition among implementations. As the standards and the products based upon them have gathered pound after pound of cellulite, SOA, Web 2.0 and other infrastructural changes continually impose new requirements that were not foreseen when J2EE was conceived a decade ago, as a chubby but cute baby.

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Q2 Amsterdam Java Meetup - May 23rd 2008

It’s been a while… for the Amsterdam Java Meetup that is. I’ve been traveling a lot and haven’t been able to organize another meetup past quarter. But here we go again: the (almost) quarterly Amsterdam Java Meetup with free drinks (or at least, the first few rounds) will be hosted in grand-cafe de Jaren in Amsterdam (see below for more info on the location) on the 23rd of May. You can expect many Java devs (usually between 50 and 80 people turn up), technical as well as non-technical discussions and of course, the latest gossip in the Dutch Java industry. We’d love to hear from people from ‘the other side’ (other other sides, I should say) as well, so if you’re doing Ruby or .NET, don’t hesitate to join in too!!

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SpringSource Application Management Suite (AMS) Released

It has been a busy few months since SpringSource partnered with Hyperic to bring our Application Management Suite (AMS) product to market. I am pleased to announce that the SpringSource AMS beta release is now available to all. Please take a moment to evaluate the software and post your thoughts on the beta forum. We are committed to providing the best application management experience possible for Spring-powered applications, and your feedback is much appreciated!

Those who expressed an interest in SpringSource AMS at The Spring Experience in December received an email announcing the beta release. Here is an excerpt from that email that introduces SpringSource AMS and outlines some of its additional features:

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What's New in Spring Web Services 1.5?

After being in the works for about six months, I’m happy to announce that Spring Web Services 1.5.0 has been released! In this post, I’d like to go over some of the major new features.

New Transports

The 1.5 release includes two new transports: JMS and email. Using these new transports requires no Java code changes: just add a bit of configuration, and you’re off! The JMS transport integrates nicely with Spring 2’s Message-Driven POJO model, as indicated by the following piece of configuration taken from the airline sample application:

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Spring For JavaServerFaces - TSSJS Slides and Demos

Today I am delivering a presentation entitled Spring for Java Server Faces at TSSJS in Las Vegas. The presentation looks at how JSF and Spring fit together, and walks the audience through approaches to integrating these two technologies.

The slides are available for your viewing pleasure, and for you to use as you see fit.

In the presentation, I outline two approaches to integrating JSF and Spring. The first approach is what I call “JSF-centric”, which is the integration approach most folks with a traditional JSF background employ today. The second approach is what I call “Spring-centric”, which is a new, groundbreaking approach to JSF integration driven by the work done in the Web Flow 2 distribution.

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Spring Java Configuration - What's New in M3

Today marks the third milestone release of the Spring Java Configuration project (JavaConfig for short). The release contains numerous bug fixes and new features - I’ll highlight a few of the most interesting changes below, but first let me give a quick refresher as to what JavaConfig is all about.

If you have any experience with Spring, the following snippet of XML configuration will likely be familiar. Let’s assume we’re looking at a file named application-config.xml:


<beans> <bean id="orderService" class="com.acme.OrderService"/> <constructor-arg ref="orderRepository"/> </bean> <bean id="orderRepository" class="com.acme.OrderRepository"/> <constructor-arg ref="dataSource"/> </bean> </beans>
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Using a Hybrid Annotations & XML Approach for Request Mapping in Spring MVC

In Spring 2.5 it is possible to use annotations to configure all parts of a web application. Seeing annotations applied is particularly interesting in the Web layer where developers traditionally rely on the SimpleFormController and the MultiActionController for form page handling. The introduction of annotations has created a third option, one that does not require a base class while still offering the flexibility of previous approaches.

While it is easy to see the elegance in using annotated POJOs to implement Controllers, the benefit is not as clear in the area of URL-to-Controller mappings. What would it be like to define all your URL mapping rules using annotations? Indeed this is one area in which centralized configuration has worked well for developers of Spring MVC applications.

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SpringSource Tool Suite Released

This year's EclipseCon was the first that we attended as a company. We had quite a few talks, which were all well received and we announced the beta program for SpringSource Tool Suite. Overall we all had a very great time and we got lots of feedback from the Eclipse community about the projects in the Spring Portfolio and especially what we are doing in the web space. I'll make sure to forward all the feedback to the project leads in the coming weeks. Since EclipseCon is coming to its end today, I finally found time to sit down and write about what we introduced at the conference.

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