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Bundlor 1.0.0.RC1 Available

I’m very excited to announce that Bundlor 1.0.0.RC1 is now available. There have been numerous changes to Bundlor since the M6 release including additions to detection and warning criteria as well as improvements to the ANT and Maven configurations.

This milestone marks feature-complete status for the 1.0.0 release. Baring any major issues, this candidate will be released as 1.0.0.RELEASE shortly.

Detection and Warning Criteria

Bundlor now detects Java types in the following locations:

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Configuration Simplifications in Spring 3.0

Second in a series of posts on “Spring 3 Simplifications” started yesterday by Keith, I’d like to provide a very brief and hands-on introduction to Spring’s new @Configuration annotation and related support.

As those that followed the Spring JavaConfig project will know, a @Configuration-annotated class serves much the same role as a Spring XML file. It provides a code-centric way of declaring Spring bean definitions using nothing more than methods and annotations. You might call it Plain Old Configuration* :) This means that for simple situations, no XML will be required!

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Groovy 1.7 released

The Groovy development team and SpringSource are very pleased to announce the final release of Groovy 1.7, the most popular and successful dynamic language for the JVM! After two betas and two release candidates, we’re are happy to deliver this new and very important milestone to our ever-growing user base.

Over the years, the Groovy project has managed to grow a community, but not only that, a very rich and active ecosystem of Groovy-related projects: the Grails web stack, the Griffon swing application framework, the Gant and Gradle build solutions, the Gaelyk lightweight toolkit for Google App Engine, the Gpars parallel system, the Spock testing frameworks and the GMock mocking library, the CodeNarc and GMetrics quality tools, and many more! With all these initiatives, the world is even groovier and we’re thankful these projects have helped us shape what Groovy is today.

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MVC Simplifications in Spring 3.0

As Juergen and Arjen have mentioned, Java developers everywhere have a smooth upgrade with Spring 3.0. Now that Spring 3 is out, I’d like to take you through some of the new MVC features you may not know about. I hope you find these features useful and can start putting them to work in your web applications immediately.

This is also the start of a series on “Spring 3 Simplifications”, so expect more posts like these in the coming days and weeks.

Configuration Simplification

Spring 3 introduces a mvc namespace that greatly simplifies Spring MVC setup. Along with other enhancements, it has never been easier to get Spring web applications up and running. This can be illustrated by the mvc-basic sample, which I will now walk you through.

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dm Server 2.0 RC1 released

Hot on the heels of Spring 3.0 and Spring DM 1.2.1, I’m delighted to announce that dm Server 2.0 RC1 is now available. RC1 is feature complete and, barring any major problems being found, will be the final 2.0 release early in the new year. So, please download the RC and give us your feedback: it’s your last chance to shape the 2.0 release!

If you’re interested in what’s changed since M6, please take a look at the release notes.

Thank you for all of the feedback that we’ve had during the development of 2.0. Please keep it coming as we move towards the final release.

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Spring Framework 3.0 goes GA

After a long ride, it is my pleasure to announce that Spring 3.0 GA (.RELEASE) is finally available (download page)! All of SpringSource is celebrating - join the party :-)

For some very recent news, Spring 3.0 GA is compatible with Java EE 6 final in terms of runtime environments now (e.g. on GlassFish v3 as released last week) and supports JPA 2.0 final already (e.g. using EclipseLink 2.0). We also support the newly introduced @ManagedBean (JSR-250 v1.1) annotation for component scanning now, which nicely complements our @Inject (JSR-330) support for annotation-driven dependency injection.

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VI Java API and CloudTools

Steve Jin, the creator of The Virtual Infrastructure Java API or vSphere API, recently contributed the work he had done for the VMworld 2009 keynote sessions to the CloudTools repository.  CloudTools is the open source project that provides the core infrastructure provisioning and application deployment functionalities to Cloud Foundry.  Steve’s code not only demonstrates how a Java application can be deployed through the Cloud Foundry user-interface to a vSphere infrastructure, it also shows how easily one can add an adaptor to CloudTools to enable Java application deployments to different cloud providers.  The following is a re-print of the blog entry Steve wrote to announce the contribution at his VMware Infrastructure (vSphere) Java API Blog.

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Logging Dependencies in Spring

This article deals with the choices that Spring makes and the options that developers have for logging in applications built with Spring. This is timed to coincide with the imminent release of Spring 3.0 not because we have changed anything much (although we are being more careful with dependency metadata now), but so that you can make an informed decision about how to implement and configure logging in your application. First we look briefly at what the mandatory dependencies are in Spring, and then go on to discuss in more detail how to set your application up to use some examples of common logging libraries. As an example I’ll show the dependency configuration using Maven Central style artifact naming conventions.

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Obtaining Spring 3 Artifacts with Maven

A recent commentor here ragged, “It’s only half of the world that’s using Maven”, when pointing out it is not obvious how to obtain Spring 3 artifacts with Maven. In this entry, I’ll show you how to do this and what the options are. This information will also be integrated into the reference documentation of the upcoming Spring 3 final release.

Maven Repositories where Spring Artifacts are Published

In general, Spring publishes its artifacts to two different places:


  1. Maven Central, which is the default repository Maven queries, and does not require any special configuration to use
  2. The Enterprise Bundle Repository (EBR), which is run by SpringSource and also hosts all the libraries that integrate with Spring
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Spring Framework 3.0 RC3 released

We decided to publish a further Spring 3.0 release candidate before going GA: Get it from the download page, do a round of thorough testing, and let us know how it works for you. Spring 3.0 is now waiting for your integration test feedback and will eventually go GA in mid December.

This release candidate comes with several enhancements: e.g. extended functionality in the new <mvc:*> namespace, and a further revision of startup/shutdown behavior (affecting message listeners and scheduled tasks). Feel free to give those features an early try! We are also keen to learn about upgrade experiences with existing Spring 2.5 applications since we expect many of your applications to selectively adopt 3.0 features… while keeping the majority of the code in its 2.5 shape for the time being.

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