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Spring Python 1.1 book is published

The Spring Python 1.1 book is published! Spring Python takes the concepts of the Spring Framework and Spring Security, and applies them to the world of Python.

In this book, you will be writing code using dependency injection, aspect oriented programming, data access, transaction management, remoting and security. Later on in the first case study, you will be building a banking web app and see how using all these components in concert quickly meets your needs. In the second case study you will integrate Python and Java together as you build a flight reservation system.

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Springing Ahead Toward The Open PaaS

A few weeks ago I tweeted that—incredibly—SpringSource was executing faster within VMware than as a startup. Today we announce another exciting development bearing this out.

Following our VMforce partnership with SaaS leader salesforce.com, we are today announcing a collaboration between VMware and Google, centering around the Spring programming model and SpringSource IDE and RAD tooling. Today’s announcement makes Spring the preferred programming model for Google App Engine. This is a tremendous endorsement of Spring as the best and most portable programming model for Java and opens up a new deployment opportunity for Spring developers. The demo in today’s keynote at Google I/O showcased the results from months of collaboration between SpringSource and Google engineers—most of which benefits Spring developers, regardless of where they wish to deploy their applications. The highlights: innovative, close integration between Spring and Google Web Toolkit (GWT) offering the ability to build rich applications with amazing speed; the ability to easily target Spring applications to App Engine; a compelling integration between Spring Insight and Google Speed Tracer to provide insight into the performance of Spring applications from browser to database; and tight integration of all this with SpringSource Tool Suite to provide a polished, productive experience.

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Spring Roo 1.1.0.M1 Released

I’m delighted to announce that we’ve just released Spring Roo 1.1.0.M1. Spring Roo is the fastest way for Java developers to build Spring-based applications in the Java programming language. With the Roo 1.1.0.M1 you can build working web applications - complete with a Google Web Toolkit (GWT) front end - in as little as 200 keystrokes! Plus as usual we’ve concurrently released a new version of SpringSource Tool Suite (STS 2.3.3.M1) which is optimised for the latest and greatest Roo goodies!

There are over 200 fixes, enhancements and new features since our 1.0.2 release three months ago. Some of the highlights include:

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Managing plugins with Grails 1.3

For a long time, managing Grails dependencies simply meant putting them in your application’s lib directory. Then came Grails 1.2 and the dependency DSL: you could finally declare your dependencies and have Grails automatically download them and make them available to your app. Great!

Now, Grails 1.3 has brought the dependency DSL to the realm of plugins.

So what?




  1. setting up a suitable Subversion server to act as a Grails plugin repository is not simple; and

  2. you can’t control what dependencies a plugin brings into your application.

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Grails 1.3 Released

I’m pleased to announce the immediate availability of Grails 1.3! Followers of Grails releases will recall that it has not been long since the last major release of Grails (Grails 1.2 was released in December), but given the need to get the latest and greatest version of Groovy in the hands of developers, Grails 1.3 can be seen as the Groovy 1.7 release. The Groovy team did a fantastic job in bringing all sorts of excellent new additions to the Groovy language such as annonymous inner/nested classes, an AST builder and power asserts (my personal favourite), all of which are now available in your Grails application.

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Spring Web Flow 2.1.0 Milestone 1 Released

Dear Spring Community,

We’re pleased to announce the availability of Spring Web Flow 2.1.0 M1.

Download | Change Log

This release is built on Spring 3.0.2, Spring Security 3.0.2, Tiles 2.1.2, and Portlet API 2.0. It features use of Spring EL as the default expression language as well as integration with the new type conversion and formatting system available in Spring 3.

The 2.1.0 release will have two milestones with the first release candidate scheduled for two weeks from today. Feedback and comments at this point are welcome.

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SpringSource To Acquire GemStone Data Management

Another week, another important announcement. The SpringSource division of VMware today announced that we have entered into a definitive agreement to acquire GemStone Systems, a leader in data grid technology.

This acquisition, like our recent acquisition of Rabbit Technologies, adds another crucial building block of private and public cloud to our middleware portfolio. Like Rabbit and SpringSource and VMware’s other products, GemStone technology is valuable in both today’s enterprise scenarios and tomorrow’s cloud world. The acquisition also adds an important middleware capability to our offering to our enterprise customers, which complements our existing tc Server product.

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VMforce Provides Spring Cloud Platform

VMware and Salesforce today announced a partnership to build an enterprise Java cloud called VMforce. The announcement is understandably receiving a lot of attention in the wider industry context, but today I’d like to focus on the central role of SpringSource technology in the new platform and the unique and compelling benefits it brings developers in the Spring community.

What is VMforce?

VMforce is a joint service from VMware and SalesForce. VMforce uses the Force.com physical infrastructure to run vSphere with a special customized vCloud layer that allows for seamless scaling and management. Above this layer VMforce runs SpringSource tc Server instances that provide the execution environment for the enterprise applications that run on VMforce. Spring applications can store their own enterprise data in the Force.com database or use data already resident there. All of these architecture details are seamlessly integrated into a single platform that allows the developer to interact with the server in the way they would with a local tc Server or Tomcat instance.

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Spring Web Flow 2.0.9 Released

Dear Spring Community,

We are pleased to announce that Spring Web Flow 2.0.9 is now available. Download | Reference Documentation | Change Log

This release includes a number of minor bug fixes, as well as an update to the version of Dojo that addresses a Dojo security vulnerability.

In addition to 2.0.x maintenance, the Web Flow project team is currently working on a 2.1 release that provides a current generation version of Web Flow that builds on Spring 3. At the same time, work is continuing towards the first 3.0 milestone for the next generation Web Flow. Watch for future announcements in these areas soon.

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SpringSource Hops On Cloud Messaging with RabbitMQ

I am delighted to announce that the SpringSource division of VMware has acquired Rabbit Technologies Ltd., the company behind the popular open source cloud messaging technology RabbitMQ. This acquisition will enhance our middleware portfolio and accelerate our cloud initiatives.

Messaging Evolution in the Cloud


RabbitMQ is well suited for the cloud for three main reasons:


  • Open: RabbitMQ is open source, has an open and active community, and is based on open standards. Openness will be a critical factor for successful cloud platforms because moving to the cloud loses a lot of its appeal if it turns out to be just another version of vendor lock-in.

  • Flexible Scalability: RabbitMQ is capable of scaling in multiple different ways, not just technical horizontal scaling but also federated messaging that spans cross service scaling all the way up to geographically diverse scaling.

  • Protocol based: RabbitMQ is a protocol based, rather than API based, messaging system. This means that messaging clients are not tied to vendor installed libraries which increases portability for applications and allows for client messaging from a wide variety of different platforms. This approach also allows RabbitMQ to support multiple protocols which increases its utility in heterogeneous environments like the cloud.

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